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Two alleged associates of the Hells Angels have been charged after a police officer was put in a headlock and punched several times

Thursday, 29 December 2011

Two alleged associates of the Hells Angels have been charged after a police officer was put in a headlock and punched several times in front of a Kelowna nightclub Tuesday.

Shortly after 2 a.m. two uniformed Kelowna RCMP members were on patrol when they saw a fight break out between several men on Leon Avenue. When they moved in to arrest the main aggressor, one of the officers was jumped from behind and attacked.

The officer who was punched ended up with swelling and bruising.

Kelowna RCMP spokeswoman Sgt. Ann Morrison was unable to say what caused the fight.

“I can confirm we are having difficulty receiving cooperation from the parties involved,” she said.

Kelowna’s Pedro Amestica, 39, was charged with assaulting a police officer and resisting arrest. He does not have a criminal record and police say he is a known associate of the Mission City chapter of the Hells Angels.

Thomas Volker, a 37-year-old from Mission, is charged with assaulting a police officer. He has a criminal record and police say he is a member of the Mission City Hells Angels.

Both men have appeared before a justice of the peace and have been released from custody. Their next court appearance is scheduled for Jan. 12 in Kelowna


suspected meth labs believed to be tied to B.C. biker gangs.

Friday, 16 December 2011

Approximately 150 officers raided five Metro Vancouver locations early Thursday morning, all suspected meth labs believed to be tied to B.C. biker gangs.

The Outlaw Motorcycle Gang Unit, which includes several police agencies like the RCMP and Vancouver Police Department, made two arrests this morning, with more to follow.

Of the five locations, two were in Vancouver, two in Port Moody, and the last in Surrey's 9400 block on 189 Street.

"The (Surrey) location was entered at five o'clock this morning," said Sgt. Bill Whalen. "(Officers) have located chemical drugs, etcetera, and really all the equipment to run a meth lab."

Though the investigation is still in the early stages, police believe the labs are connected with B.C. biker gangs.

Senior police figures fear a volley of up to a dozen shots fired in the early hours of yesterday morning could be a "get out'' warning as the Finks move to reclaim their territory.

Monday, 12 December 2011

AN underworld bikie war is on the brink of erupting at Helensvale after shots were fired into a Hells Angels gym that sits in Finks heartland.

Senior police figures fear a volley of up to a dozen shots fired in the early hours of yesterday morning could be a "get out'' warning as the Finks move to reclaim their territory.

The Finks' run of the northern corridor of the Gold Coast has been under threat from the rival gang, which is said to be pushing to expand its territory from its Browns Plains base.

Police say senior Sydney figures from the Hells Angels are behind the rapid expansion.

Task Force Hydra, set up to fight outlaw motorcycle gangs in Queensland, and the Serious Violent Crime Squad will head an investigation into the attack on the Helensvale First Choice Fitness Centre.

The gym is believed to be owned by a patched member of the Hells Angels who arrived at the premises about 5am to find it riddled with bullets.

The offenders have not been caught.

Company searches reveal the gym is owned by Peter Sidirourgos who was arrested over drug charges in NSW in 2000 alongside senior members of the Bandidos motorcycle gang.

murder of a man one source said had close ties to the Hells Angels.

Two city men accused of a 2008 murder in the Calgary area are now charged in the alleged contract killing of a well-known underworld figure in Saskatoon.

And police say they're hot on the trail of at least two co-conspirators linked to the Saskatoon murder of a man one source said had close ties to the Hells Angels.

Neil Lee Yakimchuk and Kenneth Jacob Tingle, both 31, are charged with first-degree murder in the April 15, 2004, death of Isho Hana, who was gunned down in the middle of the street outside his Saskatoon home.

Police say the paid shooting was part of a dispute over drug turf and that Iraqi-born Hana, 34, was heavily involved in the dope trade.

His 2004 funeral in Saskatoon was attended by those donning Hells Angels colours.

In March of this year, the same two men were charged with first-degree murder after the body of Juan Carlos Dequina, 22, was found in his SUV on the edge of the Tsuu T'ina First Nation on December 14, 2008.

He'd been shot after being lured to his death, say investigators.

It was that murder that led police to the Saskatoon killings, said Staff Sgt. Grant Miller.

"This was a cold case for Saskatoon police until (Calgary police) detectives learned significant new information in the course of the Dequina investigation," said Miller.

"We contacted the Saskatoon police and started a relationship with them that continues on."

The focus of the investigation, said a police source, are two or more men they say were involved in the contract hit, who live in both Calgary and Saskatoon.

"At this moment, we don't plan an imminent arrest but we're certainly looking towards it," said Miller.

He said the killer-for-hire case is somewhat unusual, but hardly unheard of in western Canada.

"It's uncommon but we do see it -- we were involved in one in Calgary earlier this year," said Miller.

Police say the two killings are unrelated, except for the identities of those charged in their deaths.

Dequina had no criminal background and has been described as an innocent victim by police.

His killing was over more personal issues, say police, and Yakimchuk, who knew the deceased, served as a pallbearer at his 2008 funeral.

Last March, Dequina's mother, Adela, said the family felt betrayed knowing a man accused in his killing was close to them.

"We were very good to him and why? He was someone we trusted," she said.

Both Tingle and Yakimchuk were being held in the Calgary Remand Centre since March but were transferred to Saskatoon on Friday.

Their next court appearance in that city is in February.

Hells Angels do a 'run through' at the Spearmint

 

FEARED motorcycle gang, the Hells Angels, have stormed a strip club in the city linked to the leader of rival gang, the Comancheros.

A group of "patched" Hells Angels members and prospects wearing colours were ejected from the Spearmint Rhino in King St, Melbourne, after forcing their way in.

Sources say the Hells Angels performed a "run through" on the strip club on December 3, hitting a bouncer at the door after a member was refused entry to the Comanchero stronghold.

It's believed the bikies were searching the venue when police arrived in numbers. No injuries were recorded and no complaint was filed.

Jailed city gunman and Hells Angel Christopher Wayne Hudson was at Spearmint Rhino when he met Collingwood star Alan Didak in 2007, before firing a gun from his car on CityLink.

 

The tension between gangs come as two violent bikie clubs have gone on recruiting drives in Melbourne. The gangs, Notorious and Rock Machine, threaten to destabilise Victoria's bikie underworld if they get a foothold here, which has seen a surge in clubs and membership.

 

The Herald Sun has been told both clubs have been trying to find members in Melbourne and Rock Machine has a temporary base in Melbourne's east.

Acting Inspector Chris Murray, of Victoria Police's anti-bikie taskforce Echo, said they were aware of the clubs recruiting in Melbourne and the incident at Spearmint Rhino.

Rock Machine, which gained international notoriety for its gang war with the Hells Angels over control of the illicit drug market in Quebec, Canada, is believed to have been turfed out of Western Australia and on the lookout for a new chapter.

Rich Egyptians weigh emigration as Islamists surge

Friday, 2 December 2011

 

For decades, Egypt's Westernised elite kept the country's growing religosity at arm's length, but a projected Islamist surge in the first post-revolution polls has driven many to think of moving abroad. Sporting the latest fashions and mingling in upmarket country clubs, Egypt's rich fear a victory for the Muslim Brotherhood and hardline Salafis in the first phase of parliamentary elections presages change ahead. "I hope they don't impose the veil and ban women from driving like in Saudi Arabia," said coquettish fifty-something Naglaa Fahmi from her gym in the leafy neighbourhood of Zamalek. In a nearby luxury hotel, Nardine -- one of Egypt's eight million Coptic Christians who are alarmed by the prospect of a new Islamist-dominated parliament -- is pondering a move aroad. "My father is seriously thinking about sending me and my brothers elsewhere because he thinks we won't have a future in the country with the Salafis," said the banker in her twenties. Ten months after a popular uprising ended the 30-year autocratic rule of Hosni Mubarak, millions of Egyptians embraced their new democratic freedoms earlier this week at the start of multi-stage parliamentary elections. The preliminary results to be published on Friday were expected to show the moderate Muslim Brotherhood as the dominant force, but with a surprisingly strong showing from the hardline Al-Nur party. Its leaders advocate the fundamentalist brand of Salafi Islam, rejecting Western culture and favouring strict segregation of the sexes and the veiling of women. They say they have been the victims of Islamophobia and sustained fear-mongering by liberals in the Egyptian media. Nevertheless, the fear that they will try to impose their values on the rest of society has driven Angie to consider leaving her comfortable Cairo life behind. "My husband recently got a job offer in Dubai. In the beginning I was hesitant, but now, with all that's happening, I'm encouraging him to take the job and I'll join him with our daughter," she said. "The Gulf has become more liberal than Egypt," she told AFP. For Ahmed Gabri, having the Islamists in power means having his freedoms restricted. "I will leave the country," said Gabri, a Muslim. "I will not stand living in a puritanical climate. Why don't they just let people live the way they want?" The next parliament will be charged with writing a new constitution and the idea of an Islamist-dominated assembly has sent shockwaves through some segments of society. Many stress the difference, however, between the different Islamist groups. "They don't scare me. We have democracy now which means we'll be able to remove them if they don't suit us," said Manar, a tall blonde in her 40s. "It's the not the Muslim Brotherhood that worries me because they want to appear in the best light, it's the Salafis that I'm concerned about," she said. Iman Ragab, a shop assistant, has resigned herself to the election's likely outcome. "This is democracy, you have to accept the results of the ballot," she said.

confrontation was between members of the outlaw Gypsy Jokers and Comancheros motorcycle gangs

 

A confrontation between rival bikie gangs saw 12 members ejected from the Danny Green fight in Perth. West Australian Police Commissioner Karl O'Callaghan confirmed on Thursday two gang members were arrested, with one charged with assaulting a public officer. They were led out of Challenge Stadium by members of the Gang Crime Squad during the cruiserweight bout between Green and Poland's Krzysztof Wlodarczyk on Wednesday night. It is believed the initial confrontation was between members of the outlaw Gypsy Jokers and Comancheros motorcycle gangs. "It's not an unusual occurrence at these sorts of events - it is one reason why we have such a large security response," Mr O'Callaghan said.

Hells Angel pleads not guilty in NV casino killing

 

California member of the Hells Angels has pleaded not guilty to a charge of second-degree murder for his role in a September brawl at Nevada casino that erupted into a shootout that claimed the life of his San Jose chapter president. Cesar Villagrana of Gilroy, Calif., is accused of shooting two members of the rival Vagos motorcycle gang the night that his longtime friend Jeffrey "Jethro" Pettigrew was shot to death on the floor of John Ascuaga's Nugget in Sparks. Washoe District Judge Connie Steinheimer on Thursday tentatively assigned him the same Jan. 17 trial date she earlier set for the Vagos accused of killing Pettigrew - Ernesto Gonzalez of San Francisco. But Villagrana's lawyer, Richard Schonfeld of Las Vegas, doesn't expect a trial before the end of 2012.

former full-patch member of the Hells Angels who was the bike gang's treasurer and top man in the Toronto area is in a fight to avoid deportation to Scotland.

 

Mark Alistair Stables, who has no criminal record and has been living here for more than 40 years, was found inadmissible to Canada by an Immigration and Refugee Board for being a member of a criminal organization, the Hells Angels.

He appealed the decision to the Federal Court of Canada, and two weeks ago that court ruled Ottawa can make plans to deport Stables even though he doesn't have a criminal record.

The nine-year "full patch" member was a former Sergeant at Arms and president of the Hells Angels Ontario Corp., in which he acted as a treasurer for 10 chapters for seven years.

"He was very involved in many aspects of the Hells Angels activities," Judge Yves de Montigny said in his decision. The "positions would have given him a good knowledge about the organization's purpose, mandate, agenda or activities."

De Montigny said Stables was "not isolated" from gang activities and "was fully integrated into the Hells Angels."

Court heard Stables arrived in Canada from Scotland with his parents at the age of seven and never obtained citizenship. He joined the gang in 2000 and claimed to quit in 2009.

His immigration problems began in 2006 after he was found carrying Hells Angels paraphernalia and phone numbers as he arrived on a flight at Vancouver International Airport. A report for his deportation was filed.

The board noted Stables had no "exit date" on his Hells Angels tattoo to show that he left the gang.

Stables still has appeals available to him before he can be deported, officials said.

Police said the Hells Angels are involved in drug trafficking, importation of drugs, manufacturing and distribution of drugs, thefts, extortions, firearms, prostitution, money laundering and murder.

"The organization collects intelligence on policing, and it operates a number of clubhouses that make it safe to conduct illegal business," the high court said. "Chapters are usually opened for the purpose of manufacturing or distributing drugs."

de Montigny said members who get in trouble with the law are assisted by club dues that are used to defray their costs.

Police said the Hells Angels is considered the primary producer and distributor of illegal drugs in the U.S. and Canada.

A person charged with a crime is presumed innocent until proven guilty

A person charged with a crime is presumed innocent until proven guilty

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