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kidnapped man in his 50s was freed by police after they found him bound and gagged in the boot of a car.

Monday, 28 November 2011

In a mysterious incident in Gothenburg, a kidnapped man in his 50s was freed by police after they found him bound and gagged in the boot of a car.

The man, who was discovered naked in the car boot, had been reported missing on Thursday evening. According to reports he was apprehended and bundled into the car in the southern Gothenburg suburb of Askim and driven away.

Somehow, he managed to call police from a mobile and raise the alarm, but as he had no idea where he was, the only way for them to try to find him was by driving around with wailing sirens hoping he could hear.

With time running out, police were wary of the man losing consciousness in the car boot, so they summoned a helicopter to fly low over the entire area. Eventually the man, who has still not been named by police, heard the rotating blades and police managed to track him to a BMW on a pier at a marina.

When the police searched the car they found him in the boot, tied up and covered in blood. The BMW had not been reported stolen and his clothes were found close by, adding to the mystery.

The car and clothes were taken away for further investigation, while the man was taken to hospital with injuries to his abdomen.

According to local press reports, the victim has admitted that he was deep in debt to a Hells Angels gang, which he said was the reason behind the attack. Meanwhile, police investigations continue.

drug-trafficking raids in Quebec and New Brunswick that authorities say could neutralize an organized crime ring linked to the Hells Angels.

Thursday, 24 November 2011

More than two-dozen people were arrested Wednesday during large-scale drug-trafficking raids in Quebec and New Brunswick that authorities say could neutralize an organized crime ring linked to the Hells Angels.

The raids were part of a joint investigation into drug trafficking involving what police believe is a Montreal chapter of the Hells Angels, said Sureté du Québec Insp. Michel Pelletier.

"Our investigation tends to demonstrate that this ring included Hells Angels associates who took over drug trafficking territories after the 2001 Spring Raids and SharQC in 2009," Pelletier said at a news conference Wednesday afternoon, alluding to two major crackdowns last decade that targeted biker gangs.

Investigators with the latest sting operation believe they have identified four distinct drug trafficking cells working primarily in Montreal, the South Shore and New Brunswick, Pelletier said.

At least 25 people were in custody late Wednesday, after hundreds of police officers carried out search warrants in multiple municipalities across Quebec and N.B.

Officers seized large amounts of cocaine, marijuana, haschich, methamphetamine pills, weapons and cash.

This home in Beresford was among the ones police raided in New Brunswick. Matthew Bingley/CBC
Speaking earlier in the day in New Brunswick, RCMP Staff-Sgt. Al Farrah said suspects arrested are not necessarily Hells Angels members, "but they do keep business acquaintances with them."

"It's possible that there will be other arrests in the days and weeks to come," he said.
52 raids in 25 municipalities.
25 people arrested in Quebec.
3 people arrested in NB.
400 RCMP, provincial police and city officers involved in operation.
Cocaine, methamphetamines, marijuana, haschich, cash and weapons seized.

Investigators allege the three Quebec cells regained control of lucrative drug-trafficking territory in the greater Montreal region in the aftermath of massive police raids in 2009.

The fourth cell, based in New Brunswick, is alleged to have travelled regularly to Montreal to pick up drugs for trafficking.

The suspects are due in court Wednesday afternoon in Longueuil, to face formal charges of drug trafficking and gangsterism.

Authorities claim the 2009 raids, dubbed Operation SharQC, were instrumental in dismantling the Hells Angels along Canada's Eastern seaboard.

Helsinki District Court has handed down tough sentences to members of the Hell's Angels motorcycle gang.


Three gang members were sentenced to prison as part of a wide-ranging drugs case.

The sentences ranged up to 10 years.

During the investigation, police confiscated illicit substances with an estimated street value of nearly a million euros. This was the first organised drug crime case wrapped up by Finnish police.

Hells Angels associates alleged to have run three drug trafficking cells

  After crippling the Hells Angels in Quebec over the past decade, police moved Wednesday to “neutralize” the gang’s underlings who had taken control of the biker gang’s drug operations.

Police arrested 25 people in a sweep in Montreal and across the South Shore. Most of those picked up are Hells Angels associates alleged to have run three drug trafficking cells since a police task force arrested almost all of the Hells Angels full-patch members in Quebec in 2009.


“They’re the people who took the place that had been left by bikers arrested following (police raids in 2001 and 2009),” said Surete du Quebec Lt. Guy Lapointe.

Four hundred officers from the Surete, Montreal police, the RCMP and several local police departments carried out 52 search warrants in 25 municipalities in Montreal and the South Shore.

Police seized more than $300,000 in cash, eight kilograms of cocaine, 24 firearms and other quantities of drugs in a sweep dubbed Operation Carcan.

Police also arrested underlings alleged to have been involved in a fourth drug trafficking network in New Brunswick.

Most of the Quebec suspects were arraigned Wednesday afternoon by video-conference. They face various charges, including drug trafficking, gangsterism, conspiracy and possession of weapons.

One of those arrested is Marc-Andre Lachance, who was charged last month in connection with the assault of an off-duty Montreal police officer in the Mexican resort town of Playa del Carmen in January.

Lachance, 28, and Shane Kenneth Maloney were charged with intimidating a peace officer and conspiracy.

The vacationing police officer was badly beaten up at a bar in the resort town near Cancun.

Over the past 10 years, two major police investigations have brought the Hells Angels in Quebec to their knees.

In 2001, Operation Springtime took flamboyant kingpin Maurice (Mom) Boucher and other members of his Nomads chapter off the streets. In 2009, Operation SharQc netted 130 members of the Hells Angels, including almost all of the full-patch gang members left in Quebec and several associates.

However, last June, a judge released 31 of the suspects in the mega-trial because he didn’t feel they could be tried within a reasonable time frame.

The Pagans are the dominant motorcycle gang in New Jersey

Wednesday, 23 November 2011

The Pagans are the dominant motorcycle gang in New Jersey and are longtime rivals of the Hells Angels, determined to defend New Jersey sites as Pagan turf. There clubhouse is located at the bar Jessie’s Place in Elizabeth, but up until recently, the President of the local chapter was a resident of Berkeley Heights.

-Detective Sullivan stated that members of Pagan’s OMC attend the Fourth of July celebration in Berkeley Heights every year along with other competing motorcycle gangs to try and recruit new members. Sullivan states that police pat everybody on motorcycles down and keep the rival gangs separated, but their presence is known at this family event.

-The gang has also been spotted at the Harley Dealership in Rahway as well as other motorcycle runs and rallies where gang members hand out business cards in order to recruit new members.

-Pagan’s OMC identifiers include denim vests with “Pagans” on the top rocker, an image of Surtr (the Norse god of fire) in the center, and “MC” on the bottom rocker. The language used includes the mottos “god forgives pagans don’t” and “forever pagans.”

Seven Okanagan men, including two full-patch Hells Angels, made their first appearance in a Vancouver courtroom Monday

Seven Okanagan men, including two full-patch Hells Angels, made their first appearance in a Vancouver courtroom Monday for the June beating death of Kelowna resident Dain Phillips.

The men — HA members Robert Thomas and Norm Cocks — as well as Cocks's father Robert, Anson Schell, Thomas Vaughan and brothers Daniel and Matthew McRae were charged with second-degree murder two weeks after the fatal assault on Phillips on June 12.

They made their initial appearances in Kelowna Provincial Court, where five of the accused were released on bail.

But Crown prosecutors have decided to proceed by way of direct indictment, meaning the case goes straight to B.C. Supreme Court without a preliminary hearing at the provincial court level. And prosecutors have moved the case to Vancouver, where the accused appeared Monday in a new high-security courtroom built for an unrelated gang murder case.

There is a ban on publication of evidence and submissions in the case.

Justice Arne Silverman put the matter over until Dec. 19, with a tentative start date for the eight-month trial sometime in January 2013.

Thomas, 46, and Norm Cocks, 31, appeared wearing red prison garb from the North Fraser Pretrial Centre, where they remain in custody. The others — Dan McRae, 21, Matt McRae, 19, Schell, 19, Vaughan, 22 and Robert Cocks, 53 — arrived with relatives and supporters, each being directed to their seat behind bulletproof Plexiglas.

No one from Phillips's family attended Monday.

The Vancouver Sun earlier reported that Phillips, a married father of three, tried to intervene peacefully in a dispute two of his sons were having with a pair of brothers with whom they had attended Rutland Secondary.

When Phillips drove to a meeting place on McCurdy Road in the early evening of June 12, he was attacked by a group of men who had arrived in two separate vehicles. He died later in hospital.

Trial CFSEU Supt. Pat Fogarty, of the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit, said after the arrests that Phillips was simply trying to do the right thing and resolve the problem when he was savagely attacked.

The elder Cocks is president of a Hells Angels puppet club called the Throttle Lockers, while the four youngest accused were described by police as associates of the notorious biker gang.

The case is believed to be the first in the 28-year-history of the Hells Angels in B.C. where a club member has been charged with murder.

Hells Angels members Robert Thomas and Norm Cocks, appeared in courtroom 67 at the Vancouver Law Courts Monday for a first appearance on a second-degree murder charge.

All seven, including Hells Angels members Robert Thomas and Norm Cocks, appeared in courtroom 67 at the Vancouver Law Courts Monday for a first appearance  on a second-degree murder charge.

Thomas and Cocks remain in custody, while the others – Cocks dad Robert, brothers Daniel and Matthew McRae, Thomas Vaughan and Anson Schell – are out on bail.

Crown spokesman Neil MacKenzie said the decision to move the case to the Lower Mainland was made “given the number of the accused, the number of counsel involved and the demands the case would place on court resources in Kelowna.”

“The Crown perspective is that the matter should proceed in Vancouver.  As a result, the Crown filed the Direct Indictment with the Supreme Court in Vancouver,” he said.

There is a ban on publication on evidence and submissions in the case.

The trial won’t get underway until at least January 2013.

Murder trial begins for two Hells Angels, five others

 

two full-patch Hells Angels, made their first appearance in a Vancouver courtroom Monday for the June beating death of Kelowna resident Dain Phillips. The men - Hells Angels members Robert Thomas and Norm Cocks - as well as Cocks' father Robert, Anson Schell, Thomas Vaughan and brothers Daniel and Matthew McRae were charged with second-degree murder two weeks after the fatal assault on Phillips on June 12. They made their initial appearances in Kelowna Provincial Court, where five of the accused were released on bail. But Crown prosecutors have decided to proceed by way of direct indictment, meaning the case goes straight to B.C. Supreme Court without a preliminary hearing at the Provincial Court level. And prosecutors have moved the case to Vancouver, where the accused appeared Monday in a new high-security courtroom built for an unrelated gang murder case. Crown spokesman Neil MacKenzie said the decision to move the case to the Lower Mainland was made "given the number of the accused, the number of counsel involved and the demands the case would place on court resources in Kelowna." There is a ban on publication of evidence and submissions in the case. Justice Arne Silverman put the matter over until Dec. 19, with a tentative start date for the eight-month trial sometime in January 2013. Thomas, 46, and Norm Cocks, 31, appeared wearing red prison garb from the North Fraser Pretrial Centre, where they remain in custody. The others - Dan McRae, 21, Matt McRae, 19, Schell, 19, Vaughan, 22 and Robert Cocks, 53 - arrived with relatives and supporters, each being directed to seats behind bulletproof Plexiglas. No one from Phillips's family attended Monday. The Vancouver Sun earlier reported that Phillips, a married father of three, tried to intervene peacefully in a dispute two of his sons were having with a pair of brothers with whom they had attended Rutland secondary. When Phillips drove to a meeting place on McCurdy Road in the early evening of June 12, he was attacked by a group of men who had arrived in two separate vehicles. He died later in hospital. Insp. Pat Fogarty, of the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit, said after the arrests that Phillips was trying to resolve the problem when he was savagely attacked. The elder Cocks is president of a Hells Angels puppet club called the Throttle Lockers, while the four youngest accused were described by police as gang associates. The case is believed to be the first in the 28-year-history of the Hells Angels in B.C. where a club member has been charged with murder.

Hell's Angels are trying to restore their foothold in the city.

Monday, 21 November 2011

London, Ont., police say the Hell's Angels are trying to restore their foothold in the city.

They say officers are keeping close watch after roughly 100 of the motorcycle club's members rode into town this weekend.

Police spokesman Dennis Rivest says they don't expect any trouble from the bikers and so far, none has been reported.

The force's biker enforcement unit says London is already home to 13 Hell's Angels, one prospect and four "hangarounds."

The group has dozens of chapters across the province.

trial next year involving 22 Finks and Hells Angels members.

Defence lawyer Craig Caldicott says he does not know how the legal system will be able to handle a potential trial next year involving 22 Finks and Hells Angels members.

They are facing charges over a fight at an Adelaide city nightclub last May.

Along with the men charged, there could be as many as 25 lawyers in the courtroom at any time.

Mr Caldicott says a special courtroom may need to be built and more security provided.

"In New South Wales, they did exactly that. You may remember the airport incident involving the Hells Angels and Comancheros interstate? And they were able to deal with it in New South Wales," he said.

"But here we can't even build a disabled access for the Chief Justice to get in and out of court.

"How are we going to build a courthouse?"

100 members of an Australian motorcycle gang are expected to descend on Christchurch this weekend.

Friday, 18 November 2011


The Rebels, who have been trying to establish a presence in New Zealand since the start of the year, have already attracted police attention throughout the country, but mostly in the North Island.

Intelligence received by police has suggested that the gang has already tried to book accommodation for 80 to 100 members on campsites in Christchurch.

Detective Sergeant Kevin Holder, of Christchurch CIB, said yesterday the information indicated the Rebels intended to hold a meeting in Canterbury this weekend. "We believe they may be having a poker run on Sunday. It's what we believe, as opposed to what we know."

Poker runs involve bikers picking up playing cards at five pubs across the city. At the end the winner is the biker with the best hand.

Holder said police did not know why the gang was coming to Christchurch.

Four-year sentence for fatal Maple Ridge stabbing

Tuesday, 15 November 2011

 

A drunken argument between two men on their way to an after-hours bash at a Hells Angels clubhouse led to the fatal stabbing of one and a four-year sentence for the other. B.C. Supreme Court Justice Ronald McKinnon handed Coquitlam's Andrew Leach the jail term Monday after he pleaded guilty to manslaughter for killing James William Ball on Sept. 25, 2009. Leach has already been in jail for more than two years, so McKinnon credited him with double-time and said the sentence equalled an eight-year term. McKinnon addressed Ball's family in the New Westminster courtroom before pronouncing the sentence. "I can only express the court's sympathy for their very grave loss. Nothing done today is going to lessen their burden or make things easier. I read the very poignant victim impact statements which underscore the loss and pain this offence has occasioned to these innocent victims," McKinnon said. "I doubt that I am the first person to observe that this death was completely avoidable which makes it all the more tragic." Crown prosecutor Andrew Blunt read an agreed statement of facts and played a grainy, dark video of the fatal stabbing behind a Safeway on Lougheed Highway in Maple Ridge. Leach, Ball and a third man had been drinking at Club Climax in Maple Ridge until it closed at 2 a.m. They all decided to head to a nearby HA clubhouse for an after-hours party in a truck driven by the third man, Blunt explained. During the ride, Ball, 43, and Leach, now 28, began to argue. The driver pulled over behind the Safeway to relieve himself, as the conflict between the two men escalated and they got out of the truck. The Safeway video shows Leach repeatedly stabbing Ball, who is left slumped over a railing on the loading dock. The driver panicked and took off, though later returned for Leach, Blunt said. Ball was not discovered for more than three hours and later died from massive blood loss. McKinnon noted that the injuries to his neck, chest and abdomen wouldn't have been fatal if Ball had received help right away. "It seems apparent that immediate aid for Mr. Ball following his stab wounds would have saved his life," McKinnon said. Instead, Leach was dropped at his Coquitlam condo and learned the next day that Ball had died. The friend present at the crime scene ended up cooperating with police and wore a wire when he later met with Leach to get details of the stabbing. During the recorded meeting, Leach said "because he used a small knife, the wounds should not have been fatal." He explained that he had got rid of the murder weapon and burned his clothes. Leach was originally charged with second-degree murder. He pleaded guilty two months ago to manslaughter. The young father had no criminal history until the stabbing, McKinnon noted. "While one can evoke alcohol as a contributing factor, it does not excuse the crime nor does anyone suggest that it should," the judge said. "Perhaps it stands as a wake-up call to those whose consumption of alcohol tends to deprive them of reason and sense." He said he didn't know what the argument was about, "but it had to be something quite frivolous but made into a big deal because of alcohol consumption."

Bikies will face tougher penalties than the general population for some offences if they break the law

Sunday, 13 November 2011

Bikies main

A new bill discussed in Parliament aims at making life a lot harder for outlaw motorcycle gangs.

Bikies will face tougher penalties than the general population for some offences if they break the law under legislation the State Government is keen to introduce.

Attorney General Christian Porter hopes to shatter the core of outlaw bikie gangs with the new law, which would make WA's organised crime laws the toughest in the country.

"For a range of prescribed offences which may be committed by members of organised crime, courts would be required to impose at least two years imprisonment - or for more serious offences, at least 75 per cent of the statutory maximum penalty for the offence," he said.




Hells Angels' bar venture downsized

 

The Hells Angels’ business foray into Phuket appears to be in a state of purgatory – at least from afar. The notorious international biker gang ventured onto the island last year, opening a bar in Patong – The Other Place – in May 2010. It attracted the attention of the Brisbane-based Courier Mail newspaper, which recently published an article about Australian biker gangs spreading their operations to Thailand. However, the story’s claims of the Patong bar becoming “popular with bikies worldwide” appear to be somewhat sensationalised. Indeed, instead of being the “unique” concept and “spacious biker bar” described on the Hells Angels website, The Other Place has been forced to downgrade its venue due to a lack of clientele, according to a source. The bar’s original premises, in JJ Plaza near Jungeylon, have been closed for several months. Instead, the bar is now in a much smaller venue in Soi Easy, one of the many avenues of sleaze found off Soi Bangla, and is capable of seating just a handful of patrons. There’s not even drive-up access for Harleys. The Phuket News visited the bar last week, but the two owners were in Australia and unavailable for comment. Repeated emails to the Hells Angels Brisbane chapter, with which (according to the Courier Mail) The Other Place is affiliated, were also met with no response. Regardless of the size of the bar, it’s no secret the Hell’s Angels carry with them a very particular reputation – for drug trafficking, extortion and acts of extreme violence. The Brisbane chapter alone, since 1995, has had 14 members arrested, 30 charged with criminal offences, and 19 convictions (including murder, attempted murder, grievous bodily harm, and drug trafficking) for a total jail time of 68 years. A Queensland-based police officer reportedly told the Courier Mail that Thailand was significant as a source of chemicals for drug manufacture and trafficking, adding that scrutiny of Gold Coast bikers’ travel would show “a lot of trips” here. “A lot of them [bikers] are looking into Thailand – it gives them the opportunity to source pharmaceuticals,” the source was quoted as saying. So far though, police in Phuket are aware of no such problems arising, with Deputy Superintendent of Kathu Police Station Pol Lt Col Kittipong Klykaew saying he had received “no reports of violence or illegal activity”. He was not even aware of who the Hells Angels were. While there is no evidence to suggest any illegal activity occurring at the bar or from any Hells Angels members based in Phuket, the opening of The Other Place has raised eyebrows amongst the local biker community. One individual, who wanted to remain anonymous, said: “The local biker community are aware of Hells Angels being here. They are not the kind of guys who you can mess around with. “So far, they haven’t caused any trouble with local bikers. By setting boundaries, local bikers avoid getting involved with them.” Thailand’s biker groups generally have a reputation for being very peaceful, while the Hells Angels’ primary motto is “When we do right, nobody remembers. When we do wrong, nobody forgets”. The Hells Angels are not the only ones on the move – the Bandidos have a prospect chapter in Phuket and a full fledged chapter in Bangkok, and about five years ago hit the news when members were arrested over allegations of illegal land dealings on Koh Samui. The charges were eventually dropped.

Stephen Kinzey used his experience riding his Harley-Davidson to teach about motion and physiology

 

 He researched the effects of video games on the health of children. And he chatted with his students about being a father and a devoted Catholic. That was Stephen Kinzey, tenured kinesiology professor at California State University, San Bernardino. But police said they know of another Stephen Kinzey, one who calls himself Skinz. This is the person who wore leathers and ran the local Devils Diciples motorcycle gang. He stashed guns and bricks of meth inside his tidy suburban home, police say. He fired off text messages to dealers: "Bring whatever cabbage u got for my soup cuz ingredients are low." Skinz, however, remains a mystery to Kinzey's friends and students. Even to his family. "This has to have an explanation. He's a Ph.D.," his father, Hank Kinzey, said shortly after his son was implicated. "Something knocked him off course." In September, Kinzey, 45, was charged with drug dealing, running a street gang and possessing illegal firearms. His girlfriend, former Cal State San Bernardino student Holly Robinson, is accused of helping him run a handful of meth dealers in what law-enforcement officials saw as a budding, small-time drug operation. Until his arrest, Kinzey's worst run-in with police was for a traffic ticket. But Kinzey appears to have cultivated a double life for years. While chairing the Kinesiology Department's curriculum committee, Kinzey was selling Devils Diciples T-shirts on E-Bay. He created two distinct Twitter personas. One is for Dr. Stephen J. Kinzey, featuring a profile picture of the human torso, used to chat with exercise physiology students. The other is for "skinz DDMC So Cal," a private account with a picture of him tearing down the road on his Harley. Investigators aren't sure what might have tempted Kinzey, if he indeed crossed over from being a weekend rider to being a hard-core biker. "He wasn't doing it for the profit. What was he doing it for? To be cool? I don't know. He has a job. He's a tenured professor," said San Bernardino County Deputy District Attorney Steven Sanchez, who heads the gang unit. "That's how a lot of guys move up. I can bring money into the club. I can increase our reputation." Mississippi roots Kinzey's romance with biker gangs started while he was teaching at the University of Mississippi in 1997, when he joined the local chapter of the Boozefighters Motorcycle Club just as he was getting a divorce, court records show. Its consummation occurred a little more than a decade ago, when he moved to San Bernardino County, birthplace of the Hells Angels and Vagos motorcycle gangs. Kinzey started two local motorcycle clubs in Southern California, but moved on or was forced out of both, before forming the mountain chapter of the Devils Diciples. It was a band of about six members from the San Bernardino Mountains and neighboring towns. There were recent signs of trouble. One Diciples member stabbed another biker last November outside of a popular biker hangout. Three others have been charged with possession of methamphetamine with intent to sell. Along with Kinzey, local Diciples members declined to comment for this article. But two people who know Kinzey said others in the chapter did not sanction a drug ring. The Devils Diciples started in Fontana, Calif., in 1967 but is now headquartered in Detroit, Kinzey's hometown. The club is believed to have about 150 members nationwide, and its website explicitly states it is a motorcycle enthusiasts' organization and "NOT a criminal organization." "Diciples" was purposely misspelled to distance the club from any religious affiliation. The Justice Department charged the club's former national president, Jeff Garvin "Fat Dog" Smith, with federal drug-trafficking charges in 2009, but months later it quietly dropped charges against him and 17 other Diciples members. In Southern California, the North Hollywood chapter is the largest, with smaller branches in Fontana, Montclair and the San Bernardino Mountains. "They're not as prominent as other biker gangs, but don't let that fool you. They're just as active," said Sheriff's Detective Jason Rosenbaum, who led the investigation against Kinzey. House raided When police raided Kinzey's house in August, they found a pound of meth, loaded handguns and rifles and "cuts" — biker leathers. The evidence needed for a search warrant was obtained when authorities tapped Kinzey's cellphone. They said they captured his text-message chatter with dealers and his supplier, leading them to Kinzey's suspected web of street dealers. But James Glick, Kinzey's defense attorney, said authorities had blown the case out of proportion. "This is not a major drug case," he said. "It's just because of what (Kinzey) does for a living." Glick also brushed aside allegations that the Devils Diciples is a criminal street gang. No other club members have been charged in the case, he said. "It's a motorcycle club," he said. "It's not like the Hells Angels." The day his house was raided, Kinzey was in Nebraska, on his way home after visiting his teenage daughter in Michigan, according to friends and family. Kinzey, who is on paid administrative leave from the university, turned himself in the next week and is out on bail. At Cal State San Bernardino, Kinzey has been a favorite among his students. He taught kinesiology, was a whiz with statistics and always made himself available to those who needed his help. "I could call him at 3 a.m. with a question, and he'd get back to me," said Nik Young, 25, a senior. "That's why I'm so shocked. It just doesn't seem like that'd be a part of a guy who is as positive and caring as he is." But Mike Lucas, senior kinesiology major who had Kinzey as his faculty adviser, said the professor's behavior started to change this past year. "He was always late for class," Lucas said. "He was distracted. You could tell there was something on his mind. It just seemed like he really didn't care that much anymore."

Professor accused as biker drug-gang leader

Saturday, 12 November 2011

 

Stephen Kinzey used his experience riding his Harley-Davidson to teach about motion and physiology. He researched the effects of video games on the health of children. And he chatted with his students about being a father and a devoted Catholic. That was Stephen Kinzey, tenured kinesiology professor at California State University, San Bernardino. But police said they know of another Stephen Kinzey, one who calls himself Skinz. This is the person who wore leathers and ran the local Devils Diciples motorcycle gang. He stashed guns and bricks of meth inside his tidy suburban home, police say. He fired off text messages to dealers: "Bring whatever cabbage u got for my soup cuz ingredients are low." Skinz, however, remains a mystery to Kinzey's friends and students. Even to his family. "This has to have an explanation. He's a Ph.D.," his father, Hank Kinzey, said shortly after his son was implicated. "Something knocked him off course." In September, Kinzey, 45, was charged with drug dealing, running a street gang and possessing illegal firearms. His girlfriend, former Cal State San Bernardino student Holly Robinson, is accused of helping him run a handful of meth dealers in what law-enforcement officials saw as a budding, small-time drug operation. Until his arrest, Kinzey's worst run-in with police was for a traffic ticket. But Kinzey appears to have cultivated a double life for years. While chairing the Kinesiology Department's curriculum committee, Kinzey was selling Devils Diciples T-shirts on E-Bay. He created two distinct Twitter personas. One is for Dr. Stephen J. Kinzey, featuring a profile picture of the human torso, used to chat with exercise physiology students. The other is for "skinz DDMC So Cal," a private account with a picture of him tearing down the road on his Harley. Investigators aren't sure what might have tempted Kinzey, if he indeed crossed over from being a weekend rider to being a hard-core biker. "He wasn't doing it for the profit. What was he doing it for? To be cool? I don't know. He has a job. He's a tenured professor," said San Bernardino County Deputy District Attorney Steven Sanchez, who heads the gang unit. "That's how a lot of guys move up. I can bring money into the club. I can increase our reputation." Mississippi roots Kinzey's romance with biker gangs started while he was teaching at the University of Mississippi in 1997, when he joined the local chapter of the Boozefighters Motorcycle Club just as he was getting a divorce, court records show. Its consummation occurred a little more than a decade ago, when he moved to San Bernardino County, birthplace of the Hells Angels and Vagos motorcycle gangs. Kinzey started two local motorcycle clubs in Southern California, but moved on or was forced out of both, before forming the mountain chapter of the Devils Diciples. It was a band of about six members from the San Bernardino Mountains and neighboring towns. There were recent signs of trouble. One Diciples member stabbed another biker last November outside of a popular biker hangout. Three others have been charged with possession of methamphetamine with intent to sell. Along with Kinzey, local Diciples members declined to comment for this article. But two people who know Kinzey said others in the chapter did not sanction a drug ring. The Devils Diciples started in Fontana, Calif., in 1967 but is now headquartered in Detroit, Kinzey's hometown. The club is believed to have about 150 members nationwide, and its website explicitly states it is a motorcycle enthusiasts' organization and "NOT a criminal organization." "Diciples" was purposely misspelled to distance the club from any religious affiliation. The Justice Department charged the club's former national president, Jeff Garvin "Fat Dog" Smith, with federal drug-trafficking charges in 2009, but months later it quietly dropped charges against him and 17 other Diciples members. In Southern California, the North Hollywood chapter is the largest, with smaller branches in Fontana, Montclair and the San Bernardino Mountains. "They're not as prominent as other biker gangs, but don't let that fool you. They're just as active," said Sheriff's Detective Jason Rosenbaum, who led the investigation against Kinzey. House raided When police raided Kinzey's house in August, they found a pound of meth, loaded handguns and rifles and "cuts" — biker leathers. The evidence needed for a search warrant was obtained when authorities tapped Kinzey's cellphone. They said they captured his text-message chatter with dealers and his supplier, leading them to Kinzey's suspected web of street dealers. But James Glick, Kinzey's defense attorney, said authorities had blown the case out of proportion. "This is not a major drug case," he said. "It's just because of what (Kinzey) does for a living." Glick also brushed aside allegations that the Devils Diciples is a criminal street gang. No other club members have been charged in the case, he said. "It's a motorcycle club," he said. "It's not like the Hells Angels." The day his house was raided, Kinzey was in Nebraska, on his way home after visiting his teenage daughter in Michigan, according to friends and family. Kinzey, who is on paid administrative leave from the university, turned himself in the next week and is out on bail. At Cal State San Bernardino, Kinzey has been a favorite among his students. He taught kinesiology, was a whiz with statistics and always made himself available to those who needed his help. "I could call him at 3 a.m. with a question, and he'd get back to me," said Nik Young, 25, a senior. "That's why I'm so shocked. It just doesn't seem like that'd be a part of a guy who is as positive and caring as he is." But Mike Lucas, senior kinesiology major who had Kinzey as his faculty adviser, said the professor's behavior started to change this past year. "He was always late for class," Lucas said. "He was distracted. You could tell there was something on his mind. It just seemed like he really didn't care that much anymore."

B.C. skipper linked to cocaine shipment posed beside pile of cash

Just weeks before notorious B.C. skipper John Philip Stirling was caught near Colombia on a boat full of cocaine, he sent his neighbour in Chase — a community in B.C.'s Shuswap region — photos of himself lying on the floor beside a giant pile of money.

In the accompanying email, Stirling told Shawn Martin that he wouldn't repay cash he owed him despite being flush after a recent trip to the South American cocaine centre.

Bizarre details of Stirling's feud with his neighbours, Martin and his mother Myrna Beckman, over loans totalling $30,000 are laid out in a suit and counter-suit filed in August and September in Kamloops Supreme Court and obtained the Vancouver Sun.

Stirling was arrested by the U.S. Coast Guard on Oct. 18 just north of Colombia with 400 kilograms of cocaine secreted aboard his sailboat. He is currently detained in a Miami Detention Centre where he told officials "there was nothing wrong with cocaine trafficking and that the United States should mind its own business."

"He further remarked that if Canada didn't have such high taxes, (he and his co-accused) could get legitimate jobs."

If allegations in the B.C. court documents are accurate, some in the town of 2,500 were aware of Stirling's plan to import cocaine.

Martin and Beckman, who live down the road from Stirling and his wife Marlene, say in their court claim they heard at a barbecue last March "that the plaintiff John Stirling was in Colombia setting up a massive cocaine deal."

Martin and Beckman said their efforts to get repayment on several loans to the Stirlings were met with threats and harassment.

They also said accusations by the Stirlings that the neighbours were the aggressors in the dispute are ridiculous — Martin has dwarfism and gets around with crutches and a wheelchair; his mother, 63, is his caregiver.

Both Martin and Beckman declined to comment to the Sun because their case is before the courts. Marlene Stirling did not return calls.

The documents show that Stirling, a 60-year-old convicted cocaine trafficker, struck first against his neighbours, filing a suit on Aug. 29 asking for $10 million in damages.

Stirling said in a brief synopsis that over the last two years, his disabled neighbour and mom have threatened the Stirlings "with bodily harm and death."

"The defendants have written the plaintiffs blackmail letters for money," Stirling wrote. "The defendants have caused anxiety, depression, stress, loss of sleep requiring medical care to the petitioners.

"The defendants have caused travel to become necessary from Colombia for John Stirling at great expense and loss from work to protect his family . . . The defendants have or have attempted to hire Hells Angels to cause murder or physical harm to the plaintiffs and have made statements by phone and email of that intent," the Stirling claim said.

The neighbours fired back in a detailed defence filed Sept. 14, denying all the allegations and making a counter-claim.

They said that, unlike Stirling, they have no criminal record and no connection to the notorious biker gang.

"The defendants do not know any Hells Angels or Hells Angels associates and have never had dealings with them or hired them to do anything," Martin and Beckman said, adding the only information they have about the Angels came from the Stirlings themselves.

"The plaintiff Marlene Stirling also told the defendants that two Hells Angels members sat at her kitchen table and had coffee on multiple different times," the documents said.

They said they learned in an Internet search of Stirling's 2001 bust on his fishing boat, the Western Wind, with 2.5 tonnes of cocaine owned by the Hells Angels. He was never charged.

Tensions escalated between the former friends in August, when Stirling "was back from Colombia and was bragging that he had two suitcases full of money containing in excess of $200,000," the mother-son team said.

Martin fired off an email, "asking John to pay the rest of the money the plaintiffs owed the defendants for loans from June 1, 2007, to Feb. 23, 2011."

On Aug. 23, Stirling sent his neighbours "an email with a picture of him laying on the floor of his Adams' Lake residence with a pile of money in front of him, holding a piece of paper with Aug. 19, 2011, written on it," the claim said.

The email said: "I told you if you waited you would have got paid, but since you didn't, you will never receive a dime and everyone else has been paid back for their investment but you."

They said Stirling warned them that he would go to court and ruin them if they didn't back off.

"The defendants have videotape evidence of the plaintiff John Stirling threatening to kill more than one person at gunpoint," the documents said.

"On Sept. 10, 2011, the defendants were informed that the plaintiff John Stirling has been seeking to hire people to burn down the defendants' house and cause physical harm to them."

Martin and Beckman said "a man calling himself Ryan showed up at the defendants' residence wearing a black leather jacket with a Hells Angel patch and was looking for the plaintiff John Stirling because John apparently owed this guy Ryan money."

Martin said in the court statement that he called Stirlings' house and warned Marlene that someone was looking for John "and that he sounded really p—ed off."



LM Sauvé masonry company briefly fell under the control of a Hells Angels member

Municipal Affairs Minister Laurent Lessard said Thursday he has confidence in Jérôme Unterberg when he was hired.

Municipal Affairs Minister Laurent Lessard said Thursday he has confidence in Jérôme Unterberg when he was hired.

QUEBEC - Municipal Affairs Minister Laurent Lessard said Thursday he has asked his deputy minister to look into allegations concerning Jérôme Unterberg, the assistant deputy minister responsible for ethics.
"We are taking it seriously," Lessard told reporters.
In his book on Quebec's construction industry, titled L'industrie de la corruption, Paul Sauvé made allegations about Unterberg, now responsible for creating ethics codes for municipalities.
In 1995, according to Sauvé, whose LM Sauvé masonry company briefly fell under the control of a Hells Angels member, he helped Unterberg get financing for his campaign to become mayor of Outremont.
Sauvé said funds were solicited from engineering companies and at least one accounting firm.
In Quebec, only individual voters can contribute to political parties, although there have been allegations that companies illegally refund donations by their employees, to get around the law.
Lessard said he had confidence in Unterberg when he was hired, but is looking into Sauvé's allegations.


Francis Boucher, the son of notorious Hells Angels leader Maurice (Mom) Boucher, is back behind bars

Francis Boucher, son of notorious Hells Angels leader Maurice (Mom) Boucher, was sentenced in 2002 after pleading guilty to conspiracy to commit murder, drug trafficking, and participation in a criminal organization.Maurice (Mom) 

Francis Boucher, son of notorious Hells Angels leader Maurice (Mom) Boucher, was sentenced in 2002 after pleading guilty to conspiracy to commit murder, drug trafficking, and participation in a criminal organization.

Photograph by: Courtesy of, Sûreté du Quebéc

MONTREAL – Francis Boucher, the son of notorious Hells Angels leader Boucher, is back behind bars after he is alleged to have violated his statutory release on a 10-year prison sentence.
The younger Boucher, known by the nickname Le Fils when he was part of a Hells Angels underling gang, was sentenced in 2002 after pleading guilty to charges filed from Operation Springtime 2001, a major police investigation into the biker gang’s Nomad chapter in Montreal.
Boucher, 36, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit murder, drug trafficking and participation in a criminal organization. The charges involved crimes committed during a bloody conflict between the Hells Angels and other organized crime groups in Quebec from 1994 to 2002.
Boucher was able to leave a federal penitentiary in 2009, after he reached the two-thirds mark of his sentence. The Gazette has learned that he was returned to a penitentiary in Laval this year and is scheduled to have a hearing before the Parole Board of Canada in December. The board is to decide whether to revoke his statutory release officially.
His release is believed to have been suspended when Boucher was arrested and charged, on Aug. 31, in Joliette with harassment of and threatening to kill or cause bodily harm to a woman. According to court records, he has been detained since his arrest by Repentigny police. His next court date in that case is scheduled for Nov. 16.
Maurice (Mom) Boucher is serving three life sentences for the orchestrating the murders of two prison guards and the attempted murder of another.


Police raid Perth bikie properties

Thursday, 10 November 2011

 

42-year-old Rebels motorcycle gang member is one of three people being questioned by police after a search of his home in Calista, south of Perth. Police say they found a 22 calibre, self-loading handgun, cash, cannabis and a trafficable quantity of what they believe to be methamphetamine during this morning's search of the Edmund Road house. No charges have been laid at this stage. Gang Crime Squad detectives have also raided a home linked to a bikie gang in Morley this afternoon. They say they were searching for stolen motorcycles, firearms and drugs. The raids are part of a continued effort by police to disrupt the activities of motorcycle gangs.

DEFECTIONS between the Nomads and the Hells Angels bikie gangs could have sparked a spate of drive-by shootings, police said yesterday.

Sunday, 6 November 2011

nomads

 Identifying ... The Nomads motorcycle gang's logo. Source: Supplied 

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But Gangs Squad commander Arthur Katsogiannis said the tit-for-tat violence was part of a dispute between individual bikies and not a war between the clubs.

Superintendent Katsogiannis and Middle Eastern Organised Crime Squad commander Deborah Wallace yesterday called for a end to the violence after shootings near the Ibrahim family home in Merrylands and at Ermington over the weekend.

Among possible motives for the violence was a number of recent defections between the clubs, known as "patching over", Supt Katsogiannis said.

"If this was a full scale war between the Nomads and the Hells Angels you would not have the shootings isolated at one particular area, they would be right around the metropolitan area and around the state," he said.

"It is a conflict between two or three individuals who are part of those gangs, and the conflict is solely between themselves and we're trying to resolve that."

Police have linked eight shootings since last Thursday to the dispute, including one inNorthmead where an innocent woman's house was sprayed with bullets as she slept.

In the last attack, a Merrylands home belonging to a member of the Ibrahim family was shot at on Saturday about 8.45pm. A black four-wheel drive was seen leaving the area after shots were fired, but no one was injured and there was no damage to the house.

In the later incident, police were called to a house at Ermington about 12.05am yesterday after the owner came home and discovered damage to the front of the house.

Police believe the damage to a wall and window was caused by a bullet. No one was in the house at the time.

Strike Force Felix, established to investigate the shootings, has made "significant inroads" about the identity of those involved and the cause of the dispute, Supt Katsogiannis said. "We want to reassure the public that we are doing everything possible."

CCTV footage from Sydney Airport. The man dressed in white is Mick Hawi, found guilty yesterday of the murder of Anthony Zervas.

Wednesday, 2 November 2011

IT BEGAN in the winter of 2008 with tit-for-tat violence between the Hells Angels and Comanchero motorcycle clubs, a series of incidents so serious that by early 2009 it had created, in the words of the Crown prosecutor Natalie Adams, a ''perfect storm'' that culminated in a brawl at Sydney Airport and the death of Anthony Zervas.

Zervas, 29, an associate of the Hells Angels through his brother Peter, had travelled from Wollongong after getting the call from Hells Angels chapter president Derek Wainohu to meet him at the airport. In the brawl that followed, Zervas was bludgeoned with a bollard and stabbed in the chest and abdomen.

The trouble began on March 22, 2009, when Wainohu and six Comanchero happened to board the same flight, QF 430, in Melbourne, to travel to Sydney. Wainohu became worried, especially when a Comanchero, Mahmoud ''Mick'' Hawi, ''glared'' at him. Both Wainohu and the Comanchero text-messaged for reinforcements. When the plane arrived in Sydney, there was a brief scuffle at the end of the air bridge.

Screen grab from CCTV footage from Anthony Zervas' murder at Sydney airport. Suppression lifted November 2, 2011. Footage tendered in court. Mick Hawi is in the centre at the back (wearing all white)

CCTV footage from Sydney Airport. The man dressed in white is Mick Hawi, found guilty yesterday of the murder of Anthony Zervas.

The group moved into the departure hall where reinforcements for both sides were waiting. Twelve Comanchero confronted five Hells Angels. A Comanchero, referring to Zervas, allegedly said: ''He's got a nug!'' (gun spelt backwards).

The brawl continued before horrified spectators. Weapons recovered later included knuckledusters, a baton and a broom handle with a sharpened end. A knife was found abandoned in a drain.

Hawi, 31, and fellow Comanchero Farres Abounader, 30, Ishmail Eken, 29, Zoran Kisacanin, 25, Christian Menzies, 29, and Usama Potrus, 29, pleaded not guilty in the Supreme Court, Parramatta, to charges of murder and associated offences of riot and affray. David Padovan, 28, the one Hells Angel facing charges, pleaded not guilty to riot and affray.

 Hells Angel associate Anthony Zervas last Sunday

CPR is given to victim Anthony Zervas.

Evidence in the trial, before Justice Robert Allan Hulme, took 55 days, received 150 exhibits and heard from 165 witnesses.

Yesterday the jury found only one Comanchero, Hawi, guilty of murder, although two other Comanchero, Menzies and Abounader, cleared of murder, face retrial because the jury could not agree on whether they were guilty of manslaughter.

Eken, Potrus and Kisacanin, cleared of both murder and manslaughter, were found guilty of riot. Kisacanin, also cleared of murder and manslaughter, was found guilty along with Hawi and Menzies of affray.

David Padovan was found not guilty on both counts of riot and affray and acquitted. He walked out of the court almost immediately. A woman screamed and wept in the public gallery.

Justice Hulme will hear submissions on sentence from Hawi's counsel, Philip Dunn, SC. Menzies and Abounader will come up for mention on November 17, when Eken will be sentenced. Potrus will apply for bail today.

The Crown case was that Hawi and Menzies had struck Zervas with a bollard and Abounader had stabbed or at very least tried to stab Zervas. Abounader had allegedly said when he got into a taxi that he had ''shanked'' Zervas.

The Crown evidence was that DNA from the fingernails of Zervas matched the DNA profile of Hawi. The Crown said Menzies stabbed Zervas with a pair of scissors and that his DNA matched a sample found on Zervas's clothing near where a pair of scissors had been embedded.

The Crown said the Comanchero were part of a common agreement to kill or inflict grievous bodily harm on the Hells Angels. All the accused denied participating in the fighting or the fatal assault. When told someone had a gun, they had tried to get away.

Hawi denied anything to do with the assault or even being nearby, despite a photo showing him with Menzies facing the area where the assault occurred.

Exhibits comprised photographs and grainy security camera footage. It was difficult to make out individuals but on the Crown case far from impossible. Much of the evidence concerned what the participants were wearing or whether they had the tattoos described.

Justice Hulme told the jury that it would first have to decide whether each of the accused was involved in the fatal assault. If the jury decided the accused had, it would then have to deal with the issue of self-defence.

It would have to decide whether the accused had a ''reasonable belief'' that it was necessary to do what he did in order to protect himself or another person.

"In all the circumstances is it possible that there was a belief by the accused that it was necessary for Mr Zervas to be stabbed in the chest or abdomen or it was necessary for his head to be smashed by a bollard in order for [the accused] to defend himself or another person," the judge said.

Earlier this year, Justice Hulme sentenced four other members of the Comanchero, who pleaded guilty to manslaughter and to affray.




Report: Nevada Top 10 in Gang Members

 

Street gangs are a growing problem in southern Nevada. The FBI ranks Clark County as the 10th worst area in the nation for the number of gang members. More than 15,000 roam the streets, and those are just the ones authorities know about. The report shows the trends authorities are seeing in gangs. Biker gangs are getting more and more members. Hispanic-based gangs are expanding faster than other gangs. Twenty states, including Nevada, are seeing these same trends. Rachal Richardson used to have gang ties. Lights and sirens were something she was used to. Her ties to gang life are over, but not before being exposed to plenty of violence. The mother of four traded in violence and crimes scenes for a better life 10 years ago. She's not surprised Clark County is in the top 10 counties of the country when it comes to gang presence. "With sex is drugs and money and with that comes gangs, people trying to protect their turf, their name, or their pride," she said. With more than 15,000 gang members identified through the report, those who work closely with gang members say more needs to done. "We don't have enough money on prevention programs, where the kids can be involved and don't fall into that path of crime," said Esther Brown with the Embracing Project. Brown has never been in a gang, but moved to America from Spain and saw the need to reach out to those in gangs. She started the Embracing Project, a gang-prevention charity. "You are a gang member, let's look for solutions. What do you need so you can leave the gang. Some of the kids, it's difficult to leave the gang because their family are gang members," she said. She hopes this recent report opens the eyes of the community. "It's everywhere. People think, 'Oh, not in Summerlin. We don't have gang-bangers.' It's everywhere. Gang activity is everywhere," she said. Most of the gangs identified in this report are from street gangs. Two motorcycle gangs have seen a growth in Nevada, but gang-related drug activity in the report was fairly low compared to the overall gang presence in the state.

Hells Angels arrested over disappearing deer

 

Five Hells Angels members and four associates have been arrested after allegedly "plundering'' deer from a state forest in Auckland. Police arrested the nine men after carrying out search warrants simultaneously on a number of Auckland properties after an ongoing investigation. Five of the men were members of the Hells Angels Motorcycle Gang and four were associates. Members of the Hells Angels Motorcycle Gang had allegedly been sneaking into Woodhill Forest in Auckland at night to shoot deer roaming the park, said Detective Inspector Grant Wormald of the Organised and Financial Crime Agency of New Zealand (OFCANZ). The accused had been going in in the middle of the night and allegedly plundering [the herd of deer] basically, he said. "The park estimates up to 60 animals have been shot in the last 12 months.'' He said the forest was a public reserve used by trampers, mountain bikers and recreational hunters and was the subject of strict safety rules. "Hunting is only allowed through a carefully managed ballot system in an area cleared of people for a short period each year. Other than that nobody should be in there at all with a firearm.'' The men had allegedly been illegally hunting without permits or firearms licenses. Seven firearms had been seized today, he said.

Two Hells Angels associates have been charged in the severe beating of an off-duty Montreal police officer at a Mexican nightclub

Tuesday, 1 November 2011

Hells AngelsFile photo of members of the motorcycle gang 'Hell's Angels'. (QMI Agency File Photo)

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MONTREAL - Two Hells Angels associates have been charged in the severe beating of an off-duty Montreal police officer at a Mexican nightclub in January.

Marc-Andre Lachance, 28, and Shane Kenneth Maloney, 34, were arraigned Friday.

The officer was beaten so badly that most of his facial bones were broken.

The case is unusual because Canadian courts rarely hear cases in which the events took place on foreign soil.

The officer, who is not being identified to protect his cover, was attacked in Cancun.

The officer was vacationing with several colleagues when he recognized the Hells associates during a trip to a bar.

The defendants allegedly noticed him when he pulled out a camera to snap some pictures of them. Police say the officer was grabbed and taken into a nearby tent where he was held for several hours and beaten mercilessly.

He had to have reconstructive surgery in Mexico before returning to Canada.

An arrest warrant was issued against Lachance and Maloney on Thursday and they were quickly arrested.

A person charged with a crime is presumed innocent until proven guilty

A person charged with a crime is presumed innocent until proven guilty

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